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Acknowledgments

Welcome to the Software-artifact Infrastructure Repository (SIR) for experimentation. SIR is a repository of software-related artifacts meant to support rigorous controlled experimentation with program analysis and software testing techniques, and education in controlled experimentation.

The repository contains many Java and C, C++, and C# software systems, in multiple versions, together with supporting artifacts such as test suites, fault data, and scripts. The repository also includes documentation on how to use these objects in experimentation, supporting tools that facilitate experimentation, and information on the processes used to select, organize, and enhance the artifacts, and supporting tools that help with these processes.

We make these materials available to all who wish to access them, provided they register with us, and agree to the terms in our SIR license.

A comprehensive description of the motivations, organization, and objectives for the repository can be found in our journal paper. The links at left provide further information.

 


Acknowledgments

The SIR project is in the second of two phases. Phase 2 of the SIR project is being supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants CNS-0958231, CNS-0958199, CNS-0958235, and CNS-0958346 .

Phase 2 Lead Personnel are:

  • Sarfraz Khurshid, University of Texas - Austin
  • Darko Marinov, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Gregg Rothermel, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Tao Xie, North Carolina State University
  • Wayne Motycka, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Phase 1 of the SIR construction effort was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants 0454203 and 0454348 .

Phase 1 Lead Personnel were:

  • Matthew B. Dwyer, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Sebastian Elbaum, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • John Hatcliff, Kansas State University
  • Gregg Rothermel, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Hyunsook Do, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • Alex Kinneer, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Many other students, faculty, and researchers from various institutions and companies have also been involved in or aided the construction of this repository or the objects provided through it, and we wish to thank them:

Adam Ashenfelter Yuriy Brun Sean Callan
Soumya Chattopadhyay Dan Chirica Chengyun Chu
Desiree Dunn Mike Ernst David Friberg
David Gable Amit Goel Madeline Hardojo
Mary Jean Harrold Angela Holland Binh Huynh
Dalai Jin Praveen Kallakuri Satya Kanduri
Srikanth Karre Alex Kinneer Jim Law
Khoa Le Alexey Malishevsky Kyle Murphy
Alex Orso Sameera Reddy David Rosenblum
Joe Ruthruff Roland Untch Ted Whaler
Vasanth Williams Rui Wu Weiyun Wu
Zhiru Zhu Tom Ostrand Phyllis Frankl
Filip Vokolos Monica Hutchins Herb Fisher
Tarak Goradia Zhimin Wang Isis Cabral
Suzette Person Samar Mouchawrab Zhihong Xu

[†] Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


You may contact us at galileo@cse.unl.edu.

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